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🌃 ASTRONOMY & SPACE 🌌 astronomy45 astronomy45 Posts

astronomy45. Lone Tree ✨ | composite image by: @thelightninja

Lone Tree ✨ | composite image by: @thelightninja

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astronomy45. The Lonely Neutron Star in Supernova Remnant E0102-72.3

Why is this n

The Lonely Neutron Star in Supernova Remnant E0102-72.3 Why is this neutron star off-center? Recently a lone neutron star has been found within the debris left over from an old supernova explosion. The "lonely neutron star" in question is the blue dot at the center of the red nebula near the bottom left of E0102-72.3. In the featured image composite, blue represents X-ray light captured by NASA's Chandra Observatory, while red and green represent optical light captured by ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope in orbit. The displaced position of this neutron star is unexpected since the dense star is thought to be the core of the star that exploded in the supernova and created the outer nebula. It could be that the neutron star in E0102 was pushed away from the nebula's center by the supernova itself, but then it seems odd that the smaller red ring remains centered on the neutron star. Alternatively, the outer nebula could have been expelled during a different scenario -- perhaps even involving another star. Future observations of the nebulas and neutron star appear likely to resolve the situation. Image Copyright: Credit: X-ray (NASA/CXC/ESO/F. Vogt et al.); Optical (ESO/VLT/MUSE & NASA/STScI) Chandra X-ray Observatory Hubble Space Telescope

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Another amazing composite from 👉 @thelightninja 🌟

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✨| credit to: @jevanleith

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astronomy45. LL Ori and the Orion Nebula

Stars can make waves in the Orion Nebula'

LL Ori and the Orion Nebula Stars can make waves in the Orion Nebula's sea of gas and dust. This esthetic close-up of cosmic clouds and stellar winds features LL Orionis, interacting with the Orion Nebula flow. Adrift in Orion's stellar nursery and still in its formative years, variable star LL Orionis produces a wind more energetic than the wind from our own middle-aged Sun. As the fast stellar wind runs into slow moving gas a shock front is formed, analogous to the bow wave of a boat moving through water or a plane traveling at supersonic speed. The small, arcing, graceful structure just above and left of center is LL Ori's cosmic bow shock, measuring about half a light-year across. The slower gas is flowing away from the Orion Nebula's hot central star cluster, the Trapezium, located off the upper left corner of the picture. In three dimensions, LL Ori's wrap-around shock front is shaped like a bowl that appears brightest when viewed along the "bottom" edge. This beautiful painting-like photograph is part of a large mosaic view of the complex stellar nursery in Orion, filled with a myriad of fluid shapes associated with star formation. Image Copyright: Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team Hubble Space Telescope

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astronomy45. “My soul comes from better worlds and I have an incurable homesickness

“My soul comes from better worlds and I have an incurable homesickness of the stars” - Nikos Kazantzakis✨| image by: @astroadams

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astronomy45. Bow Tie Moon and Star Trails
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On January 31, a leisurely lu

Bow Tie Moon and Star Trails ✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨ On January 31, a leisurely lunar eclipse was enjoyed from all over the night side of planet Earth, the first of three consecutive total eclipses of the Moon. This dramatic time-lapse image followed the celestial performance for over three hours in a combined series of exposures from Hebei Province in Northern China. Fixed to a tripod, the camera records the Full Moon sliding through a clear night sky. Too bright just before and after the eclipse, the Moon's bow tie-shaped trail grows narrow and red during the darker total eclipse phase that lasted an hour and 16 minutes. In the distant background are the colorful trails of stars in concentric arcs above and below the celestial equator. Image Copyright: Haitong Yu

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Milky Way Master✨| credit: @blazing_heavens

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astronomy45. Galaxy NGC 474: Shells and Star Streams
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What's happening

Galaxy NGC 474: Shells and Star Streams ✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨ What's happening to galaxy NGC 474? The multiple layers of emission appear strangely complex and unexpected given the relatively featureless appearance of the elliptical galaxy in less deep images. The cause of the shells is currently unknown, but possibly tidal tails related to debris left over from absorbing numerous small galaxies in the past billion years. Alternatively the shells may be like ripples in a pond, where the ongoing collision with the spiral galaxy just above NGC 474 is causing density waves to ripple through the galactic giant. Regardless of the actual cause, the featured image dramatically highlights the increasing consensus that at least some elliptical galaxies have formed in the recent past, and that the outer halos of most large galaxies are not really smooth but have complexities induced by frequent interactions with -- and accretions of -- smaller nearby galaxies. The halo of our own Milky Way Galaxy is one example of such unexpected complexity. NGC 474 spans about 250,000 light years and lies about 100 million light years distant toward the constellation of the Fish (Pisces). For image credit and copyright guidance, please visit the image website https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180206.html Chandra X-ray Observatory

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astronomy45. Hubble’s Majestic Spiral in Pegasus

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telesc

Hubble’s Majestic Spiral in Pegasus This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a spiral galaxy known as NGC 7331. First spotted by the prolific galaxy hunter William Herschel in 1784, NGC 7331 is located about 45 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (the Winged Horse). Facing us partially edge-on, the galaxy showcases its beautiful arms, which swirl like a whirlpool around its bright central region. Astronomers took this image using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), as they were observing an extraordinary exploding star — a supernova — near the galaxy’s central yellow core. Named SN 2014C, it rapidly evolved from a supernova containing very little hydrogen to one that is hydrogen-rich — in just one year. This rarely observed metamorphosis was luminous at high energies and provides unique insight into the poorly understood final phases of massive stars. NGC 7331 is similar in size, shape and mass to the Milky Way. It also has a comparable star formation rate, hosts a similar number of stars, has a central supermassive black hole and comparable spiral arms. The primary difference between this galaxy and our own is that NGC 7331 is an unbarred spiral galaxy — it lacks a “bar” of stars, gas and dust cutting through its nucleus, as we see in the Milky Way. Its central bulge also displays a quirky and unusual rotation pattern, spinning in the opposite direction to the galactic disk itself. By studying similar galaxies we hold a scientific mirror up to our own, allowing us to build a better understanding of our galactic environment, which we cannot always observe, and of galactic behavior and evolution as a whole. Credit: ESA/Hubble andamp; NASA/D. Milisavljevic (Purdue University) Text: European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope

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astronomy45. “The first in 152 years. A Super Blue Blood Moon”✨| credit: @danwalshp

“The first in 152 years. A Super Blue Blood Moon”✨| credit: @danwalshphotography

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astronomy45. A red supermoon rises over hills in the city of Vladivostok in Russia'

A red supermoon rises over hills in the city of Vladivostok in Russia's Far East on January 31, 2018. Yuri Smityuk—Yuri Smityuk/TASS

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astronomy45. “Land of Fairies”✨| credit: @ph0tomatrix

“Land of Fairies”✨| credit: @ph0tomatrix

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astronomy45. “Under the Arctic Sky”✨| credit to: @mpxmark

“Under the Arctic Sky”✨| credit to: @mpxmark

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astronomy45. ✨| credit: @shainblumphotography

✨| credit: @shainblumphotography

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✨| credit: @dangreenwoodphotography

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“Icy Night”✨| credit: @juusohd

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astronomy45. NGC4038-4039 ✨✨
Interacting Galaxies in Corvus

Data from the Hubble L

NGC4038-4039 ✨✨ Interacting Galaxies in Corvus Data from the Hubble Legacy Archive, Image assembly and processing: Robert Gendler

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“King of the Night”✨| credit to: @yuribeletsky

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astronomy45. “A starry night recently (woohoo!) and I captured the centre of our ga

“A starry night recently (woohoo!) and I captured the centre of our galaxy in this long exposure photo. You can see this area of the sky with your eyes as the bulge in the middle of the Milkyway when it stretches across the night sky, this photo however shows it thousands of times brighter than we see with just our eyes”✨| image credit: @deep_space_photographers

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“Moments”✨| credit to: @photography_by_ko

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astronomy45. • Illusory Looking Glass •✨| credit to: @taylor_photo

• Illusory Looking Glass •✨| credit to: @taylor_photo

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astronomy45. All the Glittering Stars

This Hubble Space Telescope image of a spark

All the Glittering Stars This Hubble Space Telescope image of a sparkling jewel box full of stars captures the heart of our Milky Way galaxy. Aging red giant stars coexist with their more plentiful younger cousins, the smaller, white, Sun-like stars, in this crowded region of our galaxy’s ancient central hub, or bulge. Most of the bright blue stars in the image are likely recently formed stars located in the foreground, in the galaxy's disk. Astronomers studied 10,000 of these Sun-like stars in archival Hubble images over a nine-year period to unearth clues to our galaxy’s evolution. The study revealed that the Milky Way’s bulge is a dynamic environment of variously aged stars zipping around at different speeds, like travelers bustling about a busy airport. The researchers also found that the motions of bulge stars are different, depending on a star’s chemical composition. Stars richer in elements heavier than hydrogen and helium have less disordered motions, but are orbiting around the galactic center faster than older stars that are deficient in heavier elements. The image is a composite of exposures taken in near-infrared and visible light with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3. The observations are part of two Hubble surveys: the Galactic Bulge Treasury Program and the Sagittarius Window Eclipsing Extrasolar Planet Search. The center of our galaxy is about 26,000 light-years away. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and T. Brown (STScI) Hubble Space Telescope

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Tunnel Beach✨| credit to: @undersoulphotography

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